Easter Hazards

Easter can be an exciting time for both adults and children. While we prepare for Easter, it is essential to keep an eye on potential dangers for your furry friend.

Chocolate

Chocolate contains caffeine and theobromine (a chemical compound found in the cacao plant), which can be fatal to our pets.

It is important to keep chocolate out of reach this Easter. If you are hiding chocolate eggs, keep your pets in a safe location away from the hunt and record where you have hidden the eggs.

If you do suspect your pet may have eaten some chocolate, call your local vet straight away, as symptoms can take up to three hours to show.
Some symptoms to look out for include:
• Vomiting,
• Diarrhoea,
• Increased urination,
• Restlessness,
• Hyperactivity,
• Twitching,
• And in severe cases, seizures.

Hot cross buns

Hot cross buns are another treat to keep out of reach of our furry friends. Some hot cross buns contain chocolate which can be fatal to our pets. They can also contain raisins. Raisins, grapes, sultanas and currants have been shown to cause acute kidney failure in dogs. The exact reason is still not identified; therefore, we cannot determine how much is toxic or which pets will be affected. Some pets can eat a few grapes with no ill effects, whereas others may become severely ill with the same amount.
It is always better to be on the safe side; if you suspect your pet has eaten any, please call us immediately.
Initial signs can include:
• Vomiting,
• Diarrhoea.

Noises and crowds

New visitors, noises and smells can sometimes cause anxiety for your pet. To help minimise your pet's stress;

• Create a calm, quiet spot for your pet away from the noise.
• Exercise your pet before any guests arrive.

Decorations

Small and cute Easter decorations could become choking hazards for your pet or, if broken, can cause cuts to their mouths. Ensure all decorations are out of your pet's reach or too big for them to fit in their mouths. If your pet has swallowed or eaten any decorations, please call our team.

Flowers

Some flowers are toxic to our pets. If you decorate with flowers or receive them as gifts, place them in a location your pet can't get to. Some flowers and plants to look out for include:

Common Poisonous House Plants

Common Name Botanical Name Poisonous Part
Bird of Paradise Strelizia regirae Fruit, seeds
Boston Ivy Parthenocissus quinquefolia All parts
Caladium Caladium All parts
Creeping Charlie Glecoma hederacea All parts
Dumbcane Dieffenbachia All parts
Emerald Duke Philodendron hastatum All parts
Glacier Ivy Hedera glacier Leaves, berries
Heartleaf Philadendron cordatum All parts
English Ivy Hedera helix Leaves, berries
Lily/Liliaceae Family Lilium All parts
Marble Queen Scindapsus aureus All parts
Majesty Philodendron hastatum All parts
Nephthytis, Arrowhead Vine Synogonium podophyllum albolineatum All parts
Parlor Ivy Philodendron cordatum All parts
Pothos Scindapsus aureus All parts
Red Princess Philodendron hastatum All parts
Saddleleaf Philodendron selloum All parts
Split leaf Philodendron Monstera deliciosa All parts
Umbrella Plant Cyperus alternifolius All parts

Common Poisonous Outdoor Plants

Common Name Botanical Name Poisonous Part
Apricot Prunus ameniaca Stem, bark, seed pits
Azalea Rhododendron occidentale All parts
Baneberry Actaea Spicata Berries, roots, foliage
Buchberry Lantana All parts
Castor Bean Ricinus communis Seeds, if chewed
Choke Cherry Prunus virginica Leaves, seed pits, stems, bark
Daffodil Narcissus Bulbs
Daphne Daphne mezereum Berries, bark, leaves
Foxglove Digitalis purpura Leaves, seeds, flowers
Hemlock Conium maculatum All parts, root and root stalk
Hens-and-Chicks Lantana All parts
Hyacinth Hyacinthus orientalis Bulbs, leaves, flowers
Hydrangea Hydrangea macrophylla Leaves, buds
Jerusalem Cherry Solanim pseudocapscium All parts, unripe fruit
Jimson Weed Datura stramonium All parts
Jonquil Narcissus Bulbs
Lily-of-the-Valley Convallaria majalis All parts
Mandrake Podophyllum peltatum Roots, foliage, unripe fruit
Mistletoe Phoradendron Flavescens Berries
Morning Glory Ipomoea violaces Seeds
Nightshade Atropa belladonna All parts
Oleander Norium Oleander All parts, including dried leaves
Poinsettia Euphorbia pulcherrima Leaves, flowers
Pokeweed, Inkberry Phytolacca americana All parts
Red Sage Lantana camara Green berries
Rhododendron Rhododendron All parts
Rhubarb Rheum raponticum Leaves
Sweet Pea Lathyrus odoratus Seeds, pods
Tulip Tulipa Bulbs
Wisteria Wisteria Seeds, pods
Yew Taxus Needles, bark, seeds

If your pet has nibbled on any of your plants, please take a photo of the plant for later identification and reference, and call your local vet immediately.

We hope you enjoy a lovely Easter.


Christmas & New Year’s Hazards

The silly season is an exciting time of year, with Christmas and New Year’s Eve celebrations giving us plenty of reasons to let loose and celebrate. With an increase of visitors, noises, tasty treats, shiny new toys, and interesting smells, this time of year can be overwhelming for our pets.

Here are some recommendations to make sure your furry friends are safe and happy during this festive time.

  • Make sure your pet has access to a quiet, calm, and secluded spot to hide away if needed
  • Exercise your pets before any guests arrive or before any particularly noisy events (i.e., fireworks displays) if you can – a pet with pent up energy can easily become anxious
  • Keep Christmas decorations and wrapping items (paper, tape, ribbon, discarded plastic, etc.) out of your pet’s reach. If ingested, these items can cause serious health problems, including intestinal blockages that may require surgical removal
  • Many plants and flowers used for Christmas decorations are toxic to pets – be sure to keep these out of reach
  • Many foods we see at celebrations are toxic to pets and can even be fatal. Make sure your pet does not have access to:
    o Chocolate
    o Christmas pudding
    o Salty foods (chips, pretzels, crackers, etc.)
    o Lollies & artificial sweeteners
    o Grapes, sultanas, raisins, and currants
    o Alcohol
    o Cherry pits (and other stone fruit pits)
    o Macadamias
    o Corn cobs
    o Avocado
    o Cooked bones

Fireworks can be terrifying for pets. Here is a list of tips for preparing your pet for fireworks displays:

  • Keep pets indoors when possible. The walls and roof will help to soften the noise and will also contain them safely.
  • Prepare your pet for loud noises during the day by putting on the TV or radio. Turn the volume up progressively throughout the day, so when the fireworks display commences, the existing noise will create a distraction
  • Avoid fussing over your pet. Carry on as normal, as this will reassure your pet nothing is wrong. You can use treats and games to distract them and encourage calm behaviour.
  • Ensure your pet’s microchip and identification tag details are up to date. Unfortunately, many pets escape during fireworks displays and can be found very far from home.
  • Pheromone diffusers could help to calm your pet. Talk to our team about Feliway for cats or Adaptil for dogs.
  • Some pet owners choose to use medications to assist in keeping particularly anxious pets calm. This is not something our team can organise for you without prior consultation, so please book in advance.

Our appointments during the festive season fill up very quickly, so be sure to organise an appointment as soon as possible.

If you suspect your pet has ingested something they shouldn’t, has injured themselves, or you would like more advice on keeping them safe over the Christmas and New Year’s period, please give your vet clinic a call.