Dog in dog house with bone

Moving house with your pet

Many of us dread moving house, and even the thought of it can be a stressful experience. This can also be the case for our pets. Pets become attached to familiar spaces and can become territorial. It’s important to keep your pet comfortable before, during and after you move them to a new location.

Before the move

Before moving, we recommend:

  • Seeing your Veterinarian - especially if you are moving to a new area. Make sure that their vaccinations are up to date and if you are moving to a new location, you take a copy of your pet’s medical records too. We have clinics all over the country, so ask us to refer you to one of our colleagues.
  • Organising your pets’ space: Plan where it will go before your pet moves in. If they walk in and see a familiar space, it can help them feel at home and at ease.

During the move

This is the time that can cause the most angst for pets. If you know your pet may get anxious, Adaptil and Feliway are safe, non-drug options that can help relax your pet and settle them into their new space.

Your pet and pet belongings should be the last thing that gets packed, and the first thing unpacked.

Whilst on the road to your new house, be sure to stop for regular breaks (these may be more frequent for some pets) and that your pet can easily access water. If the move is too much for your pet, it might be an idea to put them in a boarding facility or let them stay with a friend.

After the move

Just like us, our pets are getting used to the new environment. Learning the new space around them and where everything is. Below are 3 things you can do to help your pet settle in.

  1. Be sure you show your pets where they can access their bed, food, water and their toilet.
  2. Stick to your normal routine. If you stick to your normal routine, your pet will notice this familiar behaviour and can feel more at ease.
  3. Give them love and attention. Be sure to play with your pet and help them feel loved during this process of change.

If you are ever concerned about moving with your pet, ask one of our team for advice.

If you have recently moved, be sure to let your local Vet know and update your records. Also, don’t forget to update your pets microchip details as well.


dog and cat eating from bowl

Maintaining a healthy weight for your pet: your questions answered

Helping your furry family member to maintain a healthy weight not only improves their quality of life but significantly reduces the risk of serious conditions associated with obesity. To help you keep your pet on track, we’ve answered some common questions on weight and nutrition.

What's a healthy weight for my pet?

Just as in humans, a healthy weight is not the same number for each pet. There are many factors that need to be taken into consideration such as breed, age, gender and overall health. The best way to determine the ideal weight for your best is to discuss with our team.

Dog weight scale Cat weight scale

…But my pet’s always been overweight.

There are some specific factors that could make your furry family member predisposed to weight gain, and therefore maintaining a healthy weight is even more important. There are several breeds of dog that are more likely to gain weight than others, including Beagles, Pugs, Labrador Retrievers, Cocker Spaniels, Scottish Terriers and Saint Bernards. Female dogs are also more likely to gain weight, and if your dog has been de-sexed they are more likely still; the frequency of obesity in de-sexed male and female dogs can be twice that of entire dogs.

For cats, some factors which may make your cat more likely to struggle with weight gain and obesity are:

  • Breed and sex
  • Aged between five and 10 years old, when their activity begins to decline
  • Fed very frequently and more than the recommended portion (or fed ad lib.)
Sad overweight dog
Pet owners need to be strict with their dog's diet

How do I maintain my pet’s weight?

Rigorously maintaining good eating practices is the most effective way to maintain your pet’s healthy weight.

  • Feed your pet at the same place, time and with the same bowl every time
  • Don’t feed them scraps
  • Don’t give in to begging
  • Swap their treats for kibble taken from their daily allowance of food
  • Weigh them once a month and have regular veterinary check-ups

How does being overweight or obese affect my pet?

When your pet is overweight or obese, it is increasingly likely to store the food it consumes as fat, rather than using it up. This happens because they are increasingly inactive and the energy your pet is expending is less than the energy it's taking in. This extra fat can begin to affect the function of specific organs – such as the liver – or ‘coats’ others, like arteries. The extra weight also puts pressure on your pet’s joints, leading to arthritis and degenerative joint disease.

What are the risks if my pet is overweight or obese?

In general, obesity can reduce your pet’s quality of life and life expectancy; it’s harder for it to play and move around, and surgical procedures or check-ups become more difficult. There are some other issues that can arise from obesity.

Diabetes

Obese pets can be more at risk of diabetes. Often, the diabetes can be reversed once any extra weight is lost (particularly in cats), as the accumulated fat which is directly responsible for a failure to regulate glucose is no longer present.

Arthritis

Obesity in pets is one of the leading causes of arthritis in cats and dogs as the excess weight can put unnecessary strain on the joints – particularly in older pets.

How do I exercise my cat?

While giving your dog exercise can be as easy as taking them for a walk, the way to exercise a cat can be less obvious.

Ensure that you have regular playtime with your cat, particularly if they live indoors. Indoor cats need, on average, a third fewer calories than outdoor cats due to their lower energy expenditure, so playing with them is a good way to increase their movement and reduce the likelihood of gaining weight.

Two minutes of playtime twice a day, gradually increasing as they get more active, is an excellent start. Give them toys they can play with by themselves, or food toys which encourage them to play with an object to get a few kibbles as a reward.

Which food is best for my overweight pet?

There are many specific types of wight management food that is designed to assist in your journey to help your furry family member lose weight. It is best to consult one of our Veterinarians on the best choice of food for you and your pet.


Dog and woman in pool

Pet Pool Safety

Whether you are relaxing by the pool or lounging on the beach, you might want to bring along your furry family member to join in the fun! To help maximise your fun with your pet while keeping them safe, we’ve got you covered with these tips and tricks.

Dog and woman in poolNot all pets can swim

While some breeds of dog can swim naturally, you may be surprised to learn that other breeds may not be able to swim and are more likely to sink than to float in the water. For breeds like bulldogs or pugs, you should introduce them slowly to the water and monitor where they are the most comfortable. In some cases, they may be comfortable just wading rather than swimming.

Know the water

If you’re at the beach, it is of vital importance to make yourself aware of any rip currents in the area – and stay well away from them! Too much time in a chemically treated pool could be bad for your pet, especially if they drink the water! So make sure to monitor them closely and limited their time in the pool.

Life Jackets

Life Jackets are the safest option if your pet will be in deep water or on a boat. You can get pet-specific life jackets and make sure they are fitted properly and securely.

Shade

Sunburn, dehydration and heatstroke are major risks to our pets. Always know where your closest bit of shade is for you and your furry family member to retreat there when need be.

Clean Drinking Water

While your pet is running around and having fun in the water and the sun, as a pet parent it is your responsibility to make sure they have enough fresh clean water to drink. A source of clean water could be far away so make sure to pack plenty before you go as well as an appropriate dish for them to drink from – there are some great lightweight pet options available.

Bath Time

After some fun times by the water, you should give your pet a bath to remove any dirty material that could cause irritation.

We hope these tips and tricks help you and your pet enjoy a safe and happy time by the water! If anything unfortunate or unexpected happens, seek veterinary advice immediately from us.


Senior dog in sunny park

Keeping seniors safe this summer

All pet parents need to be aware of the dangers of a hot summer to the pet. However, when it comes to our senior pets, the hot weather may present a more serious risk to their health. Your senior furry family member will thank you for taking the time to go through these summer senior tips!

Senior dog in sunny parkIf your senior pet still likes to go for walks, take them early morning or when the sun is setting to avoid the heat. Before heading out for a walk use the ‘Five Second Rule’ – put your hand to the ground outside for five seconds, if it’s too hot for your hand then it’s too hot for your pet’s paws.

Be careful when travelling with your pet in the car, make sure the windows are open or the air conditioner is on. And as all pet parents should know - NEVER leave your pet in a parked vehicle.

Place your pets’ water outside in a shady spot, and make sure they have plenty of it! If you don’t have a large enough bowl, fill up more smaller bowls. Adding some ice cubes to the water can help keep it cooler for longer.

Buy a plastic clam/shell pool to fill with water and place outside in the shade. This works amazingly when your pet needs to cool off!

Pets don’t sweat like we do – they pant instead, which lowers their body temperature. If your pet is having some trouble cooling down, effective but not sudden cooling is key. Try covering them with wet towels or spraying them gently with cool water. Adding some ice packs under their mat or blankets and even making some frozen treats can help. Brachycephalic breeds (those with a short nose like Pugs, Bulldogs, Boston Terriers etc) can’t cool themselves as effectively through panting. If you see them panting cool them immediately with wet towels or spray some cool water on them.

Signs to keep an eye out for

If you notice any of these signs you should bring your senior pet to one of our vets immediately.

  • Excessive panting and saliva
  • Purple or red gums
  • Distress and collapsing
  • Dizziness
  • Bright red tongue

Time to enjoy this wonderful warm weather in the most safe and relaxing way possible!


Santa's Naughty List: Christmas Dangers for your pet

While we celebrate Christmas and indulge in the holiday season, it is important to remember to be mindful of our furry family members.

There are many dangers both obvious and not so obvious that your pet can encounter this holiday season, below is a list of some of the things to keep aware of.

Christmas pet dangers infographicChocolate

Make sure not to leave chocolate where it can be easily reached by your pet - like under the Christmas tree!

Candles

Don't leave lit candles unattended. Better yet, ensure your pet is securely in a safe place if you have candles lit.

Snow Globes

Snow globes can easily fall from shelved and break, especially with curious cats around. Broken glass on the floor and be a major hazard for your pet.

Tinsel

While not poisonous, tinsel can still be very harmful if eaten by your pet.

String Lights

There are multiple dangers for a pet with Christmas lights. They may get tangled in them or may receive electric shocks.

Grapes and Sultanas

Everyone loves a good fruit cake at Christmas. However, grapes and sultanas are toxic for dogs. Keep this out of their reach.

Onion and garlic

Large quantities of onion and garlic are toxic to dogs if ingested. Keep an eye on what your pet is eating.

Heatstroke

With Christmas time also comes the hot weather. On very hot days make sure your pet has a cool place to stay, lots of water and don't exercise them too much.

Holly

Mistletoe and holly berries are toxic to pets. Keep these plants out of reach of your pets.

Artificial Sweetener

Sugar-free foods are still not necessarily good for your pets. If your pet ingests artificial sweeteners, it can be fatal.

Bones

Dogs can only chew on raw bones, never feed cooked bones as these can splinter, causing internal damage or intestinal obstruction.

Costumes

We don't recommend dressing your pet in a costume, however, if you choose to, make sure they are monitored at all times. If they are visibly uncomfortable, remove the costume immediately.

Decorations

Be mindful of decorations that are dangling or within reach of pets, these can be a choking or injury hazard.

House Guests

Your pets may get stressed or ever excited with frequent or new visitors. Make sure that you keep an eye on how your pet is feeling. Keep your pets in a secure place if they don't like it when guests are over. ­­


Dog playing with water hose

Hazards in the garden

When the sun comes out, so do the gardening tools and gloves. As many pet parents will know, some dogs and cats like to follow you and help out as you tinker around in the garden, or even laze around next to you while you work at the vegie patch. While gardening in the sun with your pet makes for a great day, there are many hazards for your pet in the garden that pet parents should be mindful of.

Dog playing with water hose
There are many plants that can be toxic to your pet if they are ingested

Poisonous Plants

There are many plants that can be toxic to your pet if they are ingested. Some common plants that you should avoid around your pet are:

  • Lilies
  • Aloe Vera
  • Daffodils
  • Carnations
  • Baby’s breath
  • Hydrangeas
  • Bird of Paradise
  • Nightshade
  • Tulips

For an extensive list, please click here.

Rat and Bug Poison

Warmer weather brings the bugs out in force. Using poison to get rid of bugs or rodents poses a big threat to your pets. There are multiple chemicals in these types of poison that if ingested by your pet, can lead to neurological and physical symptoms.

Common symptoms that may point to your pet ingesting rodent or bug poison are:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Impaired movement
  • Paralysis of the animal’s hind limbs
  • Slight muscle tremors
  • Large doses can also cause seizures

While some brands of poison claim to be pet friendly, it is best to steer clear of it all together if you have any pets in the house. If you suspect your pet has ingested toxic materials, please contact your veterinarian immediately.

Fruit seeds and stones

While your fruit trees may begin to bare its seasonal fruit, it is important to remember that as fruits fall to the ground, your pets may have easy access to these fruits. The inedible parts of fruits, such as stems and pips can cause problems for your pet if they decide to investigate and eat them.

Some pips can damage the oesophagus and cause your pet pain. If the pip makes it to the stomach, depending on the size, it may cause an obstruction that could potentially lead to vomiting, diarrhoea and abdominal pain.

Fruits with hard stones can also cause painful tooth fracture if your pet bites into it. Fruits to be aware of are:

  • Apples
  • Avocados
  • Grapes
  • Nectarines
  • Apricots
  • Cherries
  • Peaches

Gardening Tools

Leaving your tools our overnight, or even when you pop back inside for lunch, can post a risk to the safety of your pet. Gardening tools can be sharp and pronged making it easy for a pet to injure themselves. Even if tolls are packed away, make sure they are put in a safe place that is locked and secure from your curious pet.

Plant and lawn fertiliser

Fertiliser products contain additives that can be toxic for your pet. Because there are a variety of fertilisers with different combinations of ingredients, the symptoms of ingestion may differ. In general, symptoms may include vomiting, diarrhoea, excessive salivating, lethargy and abdominal pain. Ensure you keep your pet inside while you are working with fertiliser in the garden.

If you notice any of the symptoms mentioned in this article in your pet, or suspect that they have ingested something toxic to them, make sure to visit your nearest veterinary clinic immediately.

List of dangers in the garden


Dog with pumpkins wearing a trick or treat sign

8 Halloween Dangers for Your Pet

Halloween is a time to have fun and let your imagination run wild, also to eat yourself sick on chocolate and lollies. It is important that while we are having fun, we remain mindful of our furry family members and keep them safe and out of trouble. Here are some of the things to keep in mind for this Halloween season.

Dog with pumpkins wearing a trick or treat sign
Be mindful about where you leave your chocolate goodies

Chocolate

Chocolate is the obvious major hazard for Halloween. Even a small amount of chocolate can be toxic for your pet. If your pet ingests chocolate, they may experience the following symptoms:

  • General hyper-excitability and anxiousness
  • Seizures
  • Rapid heart rate (tachycardia)
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Cardiac arrest

Be mindful about where you leave your chocolate goodies and if there are children in the house, make sure they know the dangers of giving your pet chocolate. If you suspect that your pet has eaten chocolate, call your local veterinary immediately.

Xylitol

Xylitol is a common sugar substitute that is present in sugar-free chocolate and other consumables and is unfortunately very toxic to pets. Ingesting Xylitol can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), seizures, liver failure, or even death. So even if your chocolate or candy is sugar-free it still may not be safe for your dogs. As a general rule, keep them away from chocolate all together.

Raisins

Raisins can be a common addition to many Halloween treats.  Grapes, raisins, and currants can lead to acute kidney failure in dogs if ingested. It is best to keep any foods with raisins or currants far out of reach of your furry family member.

Trick or treaters

While Halloweens in Australia does not see as many trick or treaters as America, you may still get a few knocks on the door. If you know that your dog does not like strangers or is a little too curious when there is a knock at the door, make sure they are safely secured somewhere far from the front door.

Costumes

Dressing up your pet can be cute and fun, and very instagramable! However, make sure you choose costumes that do not have parts that are dangling or small pieces that can be swallowed. It is best to keep a close eye on your pet while they are wearing the costume, and if they are becoming visibly distressed, remove the costume immediately.

Decorations

Whether you are having a party or turning your front year into a Halloween Spooktacular, make sure your pet is kept away from any decorations that have small parts that could be a choking hazard. If you are planning on using fake spider web, ensure that you do so out of reach of any pets.

Lost pets

Greeting trick or treaters means a lot of opening and closing of the front door, cat parents will know that this a prime opportunity for the stealthy trickster to make a daring escape. While this is hard to control, you can make sure that your pets ID tag is up to date so that they can be safely returned home if they do get out.

Candles

Candles are a great way to set the scene for your spooky Halloween get together, you may even bring out the Ouija Board to scare the pants off your guests. A dog’s happy tail or a cat’s affinity to knocking things off benches could be all it takes to turn a spooky night into a call to the fire bridge. If you have lit candles, ensure your pets are in a secure place far away from them.


Cat and dog in a spring field

How to tackle the spring allergy season

The warm weather brings sunny afternoons, backyard BBQ’s, beach road trips and, of course, allergies. As we get further into spring, more and more pollen fills the air, triggering allergic reactions for both humans and our furry family members. Here are some tips on helping your fur baby get through the season comfortably.

How do I know if my pet is suffering from allergies?

Whereas we humans get the typical runny noses and sneezing, pets generally exhibit the same allergies through inflamed and irritated skin.  You might start to notice red, irritated areas or even sores on their face, abdomen, back and thighs. This is usually coupled with increased scratching or licking in the affected area.

You may also notice the more typical human symptoms of:

  • Itchy ears
  • Watery eyes
  • Sneezing
  • Swelling in the face, ears and mouth area

What do I do if my pet is showing signs of an allergy?

If you notice any of the above signs, it’s time to take your pet in to see one of our veterinarians. At the clinic they will take a though history and complete and physical examination and may conduct a series of diagnostics tests and use a process of elimination to establish what is triggering the reaction, this makes it much easier to treat and manage.

The most common reasons for allergic reactions in your pet are:

  • Fleas and other parasites
  • Food allergy
  • Environmental allergy

Once you know the cause of the allergy it is important to eliminate the cause if possible or manage the environment to reduce the symptoms for your pet.

How do I manage my pet’s allergy?

After seeing your veterinarian to determine the cause of the allergy, they may prescribe medications or administer medication at the time of the consultation. They may also recommend specially formulated prescription food or therapeutic shampoos. It is important to administer the treatment following the advice given by your veterinarian to ensure your pet is as comfortable and healthy as possible. There are some other measures you can take to manage the allergy and try to prevent it from returning or from the symptoms getting worse.

  • You may think about using an air purifier in the room where your pet spends the most time
  • Regularly vacuum rooms that your pet frequents and dispose of the vacuum contents immediately afterwards
  • Brush your pet regularly to remove any foreign contaminants and loose fur
  • Keep your pets bedding clean and change them regularly

Remember to always see your local veterinarian if you have any questions or concerns regarding the health of your pet.


Man petting happy brown dog

Is your fur baby up to date with parasite protection?

It is that time of year for Spring cleaning and organising, a great time to add making sure your fur baby is up to date with their parasite treatment into the spring-cleaning schedule. Fleas and worms can be very harmful to your pet and cause them much discomfort. Here, we go through some symptoms to look out for and the best way to make sure your furry family member is protected all year long.

Man petting happy brown dog
Is your fur baby up to date with parasite protection?

Fleas are parasites that live externally on the skin of an infested animal. Flea’s bite in order to draw blood from their host, this can be irritating and painful to animals while also causing damage to their skin.

Adult fleas are small, dark insects visible to the naked eye who move quickly around the host animal. While fleas are often difficult to see, ‘flea dirt’ (flea faeces) can often be seen in the coat or on the skin when the hair is parted.

How to know if your pet has fleas

Contrary to popular belief, fleas do not always cause excessive scratching. It is possible for some animals to show little evidence of flea infestation. Some cats will scratch at fleas only when they are not being observed. Other animals can be more sensitive and will scratch and bite intensely at the area, which can lead to infection. Your pet could also be allergic to flea’s, causing severe skin reactions.

Symptoms to watch out for are:

  • Excessive scratching
  • Redness of skin
  • Bald patches
  • Visible fleas on your pets’ skin

Signs that your pet has worms

While roundworm and tapeworm are the most common variety of infestation, there are many different types of worms that can infect your pet. Some worms are transferred via animals such as mice, rats or even insects like fleas, while others can be transferred through environmental contamination in high-risk areas where there is a lot of animal traffic such as dog parks.

Different types of worms tend to have similar symptoms; however, it is important to remember that your pet may not show symptoms at all!

Symptoms of worms in your pet may include:

  • Noticeable weakness
  • Diarrhea or vomiting
  • Weight loss and
  • Abnormally swollen stomach

Managing fleas and worms

Prevention is the key to managing both fleas and worms in your pet. Treatments can come in the form of tablets or topical treatments that are applied directly to the skin. It is crucial to follow the instructions on your chosen treatment and that you are treating your pet at the proper time, whether it be a 1-month or 3-month treatment, to ensure that they are always protected.

We have put together a handy treatment schedule so you are 100% sure that your pet is protected, and you can track when they need their next treatment. Save the image and print it to hang up at home.

If you notice any of the symptoms mentioned above, make an appointment so see one of our veterinarians as soon as possible to receive proper treatment.

Parasite Protection Calendar
Parasite Protection Calendar