Waterside Safety

Some pets love to get involved in fun water activities when the weather heats up.

Whether you are going to the beach, a river, a lake, on a boat, or just staying at home by the pool, these waterside safety tips will help you, and your pet enjoy the warm weather safely.

Look out for oysters!

Their sharp shells can cause deep cuts to skin and paws that can be incredibly painful for your pet, requiring stitches and potentially antibiotics to ward off any nasty infections.

Prevent scavenging

There are some wonderfully smelly things your pet might find by the water that can be very dangerous if ingested, including dead fish and other animals (some can be toxic!), discarded fishing items, rubbish, and more. If you see any of these items lying around, please pick them up and dispose of them properly to save other pets or native animals from finding them.

Fishing hooks & line

Leftover, poorly discarded bait & gutted fish can cause gastrointestinal upsets such as vomiting and diarrhoea. Often, these tasty morsels may also include a fishing hook or line, which has a high potential of significant medical problems if ingested. Fishhooks can become stuck in the oesophagus (food pipe) or stomach. This will usually require the hooks to be removed endoscopically or surgically.

Carry fresh water

Prevent your pet from drinking salt or stagnant water and offer them fresh water to avoid them getting sick. Excess salt will lead to dehydration and can cause vomiting and/or diarrhoea. Stagnant water can host all sorts of nasties, like waterborne diseases and parasites.

Seaweed & Kelp

Do not let your pet play with or eat seaweed and kelp. Ingested seaweed and kelp can lead to intestinal blockages, which can be fatal if not surgically removed in severe cases.

Shoreside critters

There are many animals and plants that live around water – some toxic. Ingesting, licking, being bitten, or stung by one of these organisms will not only be painful but present problems for your furry friend.

Algae

Algal blooms are common in stagnant water, especially over the warmer months when the conditions are just right. Blue-green algae, and many other types, are toxic to cats and dogs when ingested.

Life jackets

If there is a chance your pet could end up in deep water on a day out, investing in a life jacket may prove to be very beneficial.

Wash your pet

Make sure to wash your pet after playing in the water. Washing off salty water and river water is essential to ensure there are no nasties in your pet’s coat or irritating their skin.

Beware of pools

Pool covers present a very serious danger - if your pet falls in, they may become trapped and could drown. Pets can often struggle to get out of the pool if they fall in, also leading to drowning. Never leave your pets unsupervised around the pool.

 

Speak to your vet if you have questions or concerns about any of the above hazards.

If you suspect your pet has ingested something they shouldn’t or has suffered an injury by the water, give your vet a call right away for help!


Hot Weather & Heatstroke

We all love spending quality time with our pets on a hot summer’s day. However, we need to stay vigilant in summer, as the warmer weather can expose our pets to several dangers.

One of these dangers is heatstroke. Heatstroke, or hyperthermia, occurs when your pet’s body temperature rises rapidly. It is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate treatment.

There are several causes for heatstroke, including:

  • Being left in a hot car,
  • Being left outdoors during extreme heat,
  • Not having enough shade and water when outdoors,
  • Exercising in hot weather.
  • It is important to know the signs of heatstroke - even if you avoid all the above.

Your pet may show some or all of the below symptoms:

  • Excessive panting,
  • Restlessness,
  • Drooling excessively,
  • Becoming unstable on their feet,
  • Their gums turn a bluish-purple or bright red colour.

If your pet is showing any of the above symptoms, you must take them to a vet immediately.
Make sure to cool your pet while you are on your way to see us.
The most effective way to cool your pet is by using a fan or air-conditioning. You can also use a damp towel or a spray bottle filled with water to cool them lightly. It is important not to submerge your pet in ice-cold water, as this could be detrimental to their recovery.

Other warm-weather tips:

  • In hot weather, it is also essential to keep your pet’s feet in mind – if the pavement is too hot for your bare feet, it is too hot for your pets! Keep them inside, walk in the shade, or use pet socks/shoes if it's not possible to keep them off hot surfaces.
  • Always ensure there are plenty of cool places with shade and fresh water for your pet to access on hot days. Never leave them unattended in a car, even if the windows are down.
  • Before the weather gets too warm, book your pet in for a groom to remove any unnecessary shedding hair, and a trim where suitable. Do not shave your pet’s coat yourself – some breeds require their coats to help regulate body temperature.
  • Brachycephalic dogs are more susceptible to heatstroke and can develop serious health issues quickly due to their inability to pant efficiently. If you own a brachycephalic dog (a dog with a flattened face, such as a French or English bulldog, Pug, Boston terrier, Pekinese, Boxer, etc.), please be very mindful of their whereabouts on a hot day, and keep an eye out for any of these symptoms.

If you think your pet is suffering heatstroke, or you want to know more about how to prevent it, call your vet clinic today!


Christmas & New Year’s Hazards

The silly season is an exciting time of year, with Christmas and New Year’s Eve celebrations giving us plenty of reasons to let loose and celebrate. With an increase of visitors, noises, tasty treats, shiny new toys, and interesting smells, this time of year can be overwhelming for our pets.

Here are some recommendations to make sure your furry friends are safe and happy during this festive time.

  • Make sure your pet has access to a quiet, calm, and secluded spot to hide away if needed
  • Exercise your pets before any guests arrive or before any particularly noisy events (i.e., fireworks displays) if you can – a pet with pent up energy can easily become anxious
  • Keep Christmas decorations and wrapping items (paper, tape, ribbon, discarded plastic, etc.) out of your pet’s reach. If ingested, these items can cause serious health problems, including intestinal blockages that may require surgical removal
  • Many plants and flowers used for Christmas decorations are toxic to pets – be sure to keep these out of reach
  • Many foods we see at celebrations are toxic to pets and can even be fatal. Make sure your pet does not have access to:
    o Chocolate
    o Christmas pudding
    o Salty foods (chips, pretzels, crackers, etc.)
    o Lollies & artificial sweeteners
    o Grapes, sultanas, raisins, and currants
    o Alcohol
    o Cherry pits (and other stone fruit pits)
    o Macadamias
    o Corn cobs
    o Avocado
    o Cooked bones

Fireworks can be terrifying for pets. Here is a list of tips for preparing your pet for fireworks displays:

  • Keep pets indoors when possible. The walls and roof will help to soften the noise and will also contain them safely.
  • Prepare your pet for loud noises during the day by putting on the TV or radio. Turn the volume up progressively throughout the day, so when the fireworks display commences, the existing noise will create a distraction
  • Avoid fussing over your pet. Carry on as normal, as this will reassure your pet nothing is wrong. You can use treats and games to distract them and encourage calm behaviour.
  • Ensure your pet’s microchip and identification tag details are up to date. Unfortunately, many pets escape during fireworks displays and can be found very far from home.
  • Pheromone diffusers could help to calm your pet. Talk to our team about Feliway for cats or Adaptil for dogs.
  • Some pet owners choose to use medications to assist in keeping particularly anxious pets calm. This is not something our team can organise for you without prior consultation, so please book in advance.

Our appointments during the festive season fill up very quickly, so be sure to organise an appointment as soon as possible.

If you suspect your pet has ingested something they shouldn’t, has injured themselves, or you would like more advice on keeping them safe over the Christmas and New Year’s period, please give your vet clinic a call.


Bee stings

With springtime upon us, we can expect to see more blossoming trees and flowers popping up all over the garden – and with that comes bees. Your dog or cat might think a bee is a harmless new friend, providing a bit of excitement and fun with a game of chase! Often this can result in your pet receiving a bee sting to the face, mouth, or paws.

Has my pet been stung?

It will be very clear almost immediately if your pet has been stung. Keep an eye out for:

  • A sudden or continuing cry from your pet, indicating pain and discomfort
  • Your pet running around in circles or otherwise erratically
  • Licking, chewing, or pawing the same spot repeatedly
  • Unusual swelling
  • Excessive drooling
  • Pale gums

In some extreme cases, pets can experience severe reactions and experience vomiting, collapse, hives, profound swelling, and difficulty breathing. If your pet has been stung by more than one bee or in the mouth or throat, their reaction is more likely to be severe, and they can potentially experience anaphylactic shock. It is essential to act fast.

What should I do if my pet has been stung?

Stay calm! Panicking will only increase your pet’s stress.

The stinger will continue to release venom until it has been removed, causing pain and discomfort.

If you have noticed any of the above-mentioned severe reactions, give us a call and make your way in to see us immediately.

If your pet is having a mild reaction and experiencing discomfort only:

  • Try to locate the site of the sting
  • If you can find it, remove the stinger gently with tweezers

Once you are sure the stinger has been removed:

  • Apply cool water via washing the site or pressing it gently with a wet cloth.
  • Keep an eye on your pet for any developing symptoms, and ensure they are well hydrated.

If your pet appears uncomfortable or develops a more severe reaction after removing the sting, please give your vet clinic a call for further advice.


Parasites

As the weather warms up, we start to see more parasite problems for all sorts of pets.

Here are some of the more common parasites we come across, as well as some information on the problems they cause and how to get rid of them.

Fleas

Fleas are relatively easy to spot, and if not, your pet will let you know! Look out for these clues:

  • Your pet might constantly be scratching or chewing and become quite irritable.
  • You might notice red, sore-looking bumps or blisters on your pet’s skin.
  • If you look close enough, you might see ‘flea dirt’ – this is a flea waste product that looks like tiny little flecks of pepper.
  • Sometimes, you can even see the fleas moving around themselves – tiny little brown or black wingless insects, with an incredible jump!

Flea bites are not only uncomfortable and frustrating for your pets, but they can also lead to serious wound infections, anaemia, tapeworms, and dermatitis.

Moving swiftly is the key to flea treatment! You will need to treat:

  • Every pet in your household
  • Pet bedding
  • Carpet
  • Furniture
  • Any other soft furnishings a flea or its eggs might be hiding

If you have any questions or require parasite product advice, organise an appointment with your vet.

Ticks

Ticks can be found in every state of Australia. There are many different species of ticks, and some pose a significant threat to the wellbeing of our pets. The most common species that affect our pets are the paralysis tick, the bush tick, the cattle tick, and the brown dog tick.

  • Paralysis ticks are particularly dangerous, as they deliver a neurotoxin into our pet’s bloodstream as they feed, leading to severe paralysis of the muscles – including the heart, proving fatal.
  • Brown dog ticks are not deadly themselves but can cause dermatitis and anaemia, as well as carry some nasty diseases, including Ehrlichiosis, which has only recently been discovered in more northern parts of Australia, and is spreading to some southern parts.

The best practice is to regularly check your dog for ticks after being outside – run your fingers through their coats to feel for any unusual lumps on their skin. Be sure to check over your pets’ entire body, especially:

  • Around their head and ears
  • Inside their ears
  • In their mouths
  • Under their tail
  • Between their toes
  • Underneath their collar

Ticks are sneaky and can easily latch on to many different areas on your pet.

If you come across a tick, be sure to give us a call to organise its removal as soon as possible – it is vital to act quickly and we will ensure to remove all of the tick – even a small part leftover can continue to cause problems for your furry friend.

Keeping your dog protected year-round from ticks is key - we recommend tick prevention treatments like spot-on drops or tick collars. Speak to us today for our recommendation and prevent your pet from any unnecessary discomfort and illness.

Mosquitoes

Dogs, cats, rodents. and birds make for easy targets and tasty snacks for mosquitoes. While the mosquito bite itself is more annoying than threatening, mosquitoes can spread heartworm and other potentially fatal parasites to your pets.

We recommend making sure there is no stagnant or still water around the backyard – this is where mosquito larvae grow. If possible, bring your pets indoors between dusk and dawn, or make sure they have a safe, meshed area to sleep in. Pet safe mosquito and insect repellents are available that may be used. Speak to us if you have any concerns about mozzies in your area.

Intestinal worms

Many different worms can affect our pets! Some species are not exclusive to cats and dogs, but rodents, birds, and reptiles too. Some more common worms we see are:

  • Roundworm
  • Hookworm
  • Tapeworm
  • Whipworm
  • Heartworm

These worms can be transmitted in several ways, including:

  • Coming into contact with (or eating) soil, grass, or faeces containing larvae or eggs,
  • Coming into direct contact with an infected animal
  • Transmitted in-utero or through milk fed to babies
  • Via insects, such as mosquitoes and fleas

Symptoms associated with worm infestations can include:

  • Diarrhoea
  • Bloody stools
  • Anaemia
  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting
  • Visible worms – either in stools or around the anus
  • Lung disease

Prevention is the best cure - by administering regular preventatives which are available in various forms and combinations with other parasite control products. Ask your clinic for advice on the best preventative for your pet. If your pet is unwell, please book a consultation.

Giardia

Giardia is a lesser-known parasite that is surprisingly common. It is a microscopic protozoan that can infect humans, dogs, and cats.

Giardia contaminates bodies of water – it can be ingested by your pet when drinking or having a swim, this is why we see cases of giardia infection more often in the warmer months. Signs your pet may be infected include:

  • Chronic diarrhoea
  • Reduced activity
  • Sudden or inexplicable weight loss
  • Bloody stools

Giardia is not usually life-threatening, but it is important to treat as your pet will feel unwell.

Give your local vet team a call or book an appointment if you think your pet may have giardia, it can be easily treated with after diagnosis.

 

If you have any concerns about parasites and your pet, please organise a consultation to discuss these with your vet.


Spring cleaning hazards

Springtime is the perfect time to shake off those winter blues and freshen up our homes for the busier, warmer months ahead. While we are clearing out and cleaning up, some of the products and tools we use potentially threaten our pets if not handled properly!

Check out some of the issues that can occur for our furry and feathered friends when they come into contact with common household cleaning chemicals:

  • Ensure that any cleaning products you use are out of reach of your pets and stored securely, so they don’t end up accidentally ingesting any poisons. Also, be aware of where you’ve cleaned with a harsh chemical – sometimes, when dry, the residue might taste appealing to your pet.
  • Do not use aerosol sprays around pets, especially birds! Move the animals to another room altogether to avoid them breathing in any chemicals or particles.
  • Ensure that pet’s food and water supply is also clear of any chemicals you may be spraying – droplets and particles can easily contaminate food and water, leading to ingestion later on.
  • When disposing of chemicals or their container, be sure your pet cannot access the rubbish bin.
  • Bottle caps, elastic bands, plastic bags, sponges, and other scrubbing implements can become choking hazards, should they fall into the wrong paws! Make sure these are stored safely and out of reach of your pet.
  • When airing out your home for a clean, make sure that all window and door screens are secure and that your indoor pet cannot sneak out unnoticed!
  • Mops, sponges, and brooms can appear like a fun, interesting new toy for a playful puppy or curious kitten! Be sure to keep your fur-baby away from these to avoid any loose bristles being eaten.

If you suspect your pet has ingested or inhaled any cleaning poisons, call your nearest vet clinic immediately.

The following symptoms are signs your pet could be poisoned and seriously ill:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Excessive sneezing and/or coughing
  • Lethargy
  • Seizures

If you have any questions or concerns, please call your local vet clinic immediately.


Dog in dog house with bone

Moving house with your pet

Many of us dread moving house, and even the thought of it can be a stressful experience. This can also be the case for our pets. Pets become attached to familiar spaces and can become territorial. It’s important to keep your pet comfortable before, during and after you move them to a new location.

Before the move

Before moving, we recommend:

  • Seeing your Veterinarian - especially if you are moving to a new area. Make sure that their vaccinations are up to date and if you are moving to a new location, you take a copy of your pet’s medical records too. We have clinics all over the country, so ask us to refer you to one of our colleagues.
  • Organising your pets’ space: Plan where it will go before your pet moves in. If they walk in and see a familiar space, it can help them feel at home and at ease.

During the move

This is the time that can cause the most angst for pets. If you know your pet may get anxious, Adaptil and Feliway are safe, non-drug options that can help relax your pet and settle them into their new space.

Your pet and pet belongings should be the last thing that gets packed, and the first thing unpacked.

Whilst on the road to your new house, be sure to stop for regular breaks (these may be more frequent for some pets) and that your pet can easily access water. If the move is too much for your pet, it might be an idea to put them in a boarding facility or let them stay with a friend.

After the move

Just like us, our pets are getting used to the new environment. Learning the new space around them and where everything is. Below are 3 things you can do to help your pet settle in.

  1. Be sure you show your pets where they can access their bed, food, water and their toilet.
  2. Stick to your normal routine. If you stick to your normal routine, your pet will notice this familiar behaviour and can feel more at ease.
  3. Give them love and attention. Be sure to play with your pet and help them feel loved during this process of change.

If you are ever concerned about moving with your pet, ask one of our team for advice.

If you have recently moved, be sure to let your local Vet know and update your records. Also, don’t forget to update your pets microchip details as well.


dog and cat eating from bowl

Maintaining a healthy weight for your pet: your questions answered

Helping your furry family member to maintain a healthy weight not only improves their quality of life but significantly reduces the risk of serious conditions associated with obesity. To help you keep your pet on track, we’ve answered some common questions on weight and nutrition.

What's a healthy weight for my pet?

Just as in humans, a healthy weight is not the same number for each pet. There are many factors that need to be taken into consideration such as breed, age, gender and overall health. The best way to determine the ideal weight for your best is to discuss with our team.

Dog weight scale Cat weight scale

…But my pet’s always been overweight.

There are some specific factors that could make your furry family member predisposed to weight gain, and therefore maintaining a healthy weight is even more important. There are several breeds of dog that are more likely to gain weight than others, including Beagles, Pugs, Labrador Retrievers, Cocker Spaniels, Scottish Terriers and Saint Bernards. Female dogs are also more likely to gain weight, and if your dog has been de-sexed they are more likely still; the frequency of obesity in de-sexed male and female dogs can be twice that of entire dogs.

For cats, some factors which may make your cat more likely to struggle with weight gain and obesity are:

  • Breed and sex
  • Aged between five and 10 years old, when their activity begins to decline
  • Fed very frequently and more than the recommended portion (or fed ad lib.)
Sad overweight dog
Pet owners need to be strict with their dog's diet

How do I maintain my pet’s weight?

Rigorously maintaining good eating practices is the most effective way to maintain your pet’s healthy weight.

  • Feed your pet at the same place, time and with the same bowl every time
  • Don’t feed them scraps
  • Don’t give in to begging
  • Swap their treats for kibble taken from their daily allowance of food
  • Weigh them once a month and have regular veterinary check-ups

How does being overweight or obese affect my pet?

When your pet is overweight or obese, it is increasingly likely to store the food it consumes as fat, rather than using it up. This happens because they are increasingly inactive and the energy your pet is expending is less than the energy it's taking in. This extra fat can begin to affect the function of specific organs – such as the liver – or ‘coats’ others, like arteries. The extra weight also puts pressure on your pet’s joints, leading to arthritis and degenerative joint disease.

What are the risks if my pet is overweight or obese?

In general, obesity can reduce your pet’s quality of life and life expectancy; it’s harder for it to play and move around, and surgical procedures or check-ups become more difficult. There are some other issues that can arise from obesity.

Diabetes

Obese pets can be more at risk of diabetes. Often, the diabetes can be reversed once any extra weight is lost (particularly in cats), as the accumulated fat which is directly responsible for a failure to regulate glucose is no longer present.

Arthritis

Obesity in pets is one of the leading causes of arthritis in cats and dogs as the excess weight can put unnecessary strain on the joints – particularly in older pets.

How do I exercise my cat?

While giving your dog exercise can be as easy as taking them for a walk, the way to exercise a cat can be less obvious.

Ensure that you have regular playtime with your cat, particularly if they live indoors. Indoor cats need, on average, a third fewer calories than outdoor cats due to their lower energy expenditure, so playing with them is a good way to increase their movement and reduce the likelihood of gaining weight.

Two minutes of playtime twice a day, gradually increasing as they get more active, is an excellent start. Give them toys they can play with by themselves, or food toys which encourage them to play with an object to get a few kibbles as a reward.

Which food is best for my overweight pet?

There are many specific types of wight management food that is designed to assist in your journey to help your furry family member lose weight. It is best to consult one of our Veterinarians on the best choice of food for you and your pet.


Dog and woman in pool

Pet Pool Safety

Whether you are relaxing by the pool or lounging on the beach, you might want to bring along your furry family member to join in the fun! To help maximise your fun with your pet while keeping them safe, we’ve got you covered with these tips and tricks.

Dog and woman in poolNot all pets can swim

While some breeds of dog can swim naturally, you may be surprised to learn that other breeds may not be able to swim and are more likely to sink than to float in the water. For breeds like bulldogs or pugs, you should introduce them slowly to the water and monitor where they are the most comfortable. In some cases, they may be comfortable just wading rather than swimming.

Know the water

If you’re at the beach, it is of vital importance to make yourself aware of any rip currents in the area – and stay well away from them! Too much time in a chemically treated pool could be bad for your pet, especially if they drink the water! So make sure to monitor them closely and limited their time in the pool.

Life Jackets

Life Jackets are the safest option if your pet will be in deep water or on a boat. You can get pet-specific life jackets and make sure they are fitted properly and securely.

Shade

Sunburn, dehydration and heatstroke are major risks to our pets. Always know where your closest bit of shade is for you and your furry family member to retreat there when need be.

Clean Drinking Water

While your pet is running around and having fun in the water and the sun, as a pet parent it is your responsibility to make sure they have enough fresh clean water to drink. A source of clean water could be far away so make sure to pack plenty before you go as well as an appropriate dish for them to drink from – there are some great lightweight pet options available.

Bath Time

After some fun times by the water, you should give your pet a bath to remove any dirty material that could cause irritation.

We hope these tips and tricks help you and your pet enjoy a safe and happy time by the water! If anything unfortunate or unexpected happens, seek veterinary advice immediately from us.


Senior dog in sunny park

Keeping seniors safe this summer

All pet parents need to be aware of the dangers of a hot summer to the pet. However, when it comes to our senior pets, the hot weather may present a more serious risk to their health. Your senior furry family member will thank you for taking the time to go through these summer senior tips!

Senior dog in sunny parkIf your senior pet still likes to go for walks, take them early morning or when the sun is setting to avoid the heat. Before heading out for a walk use the ‘Five Second Rule’ – put your hand to the ground outside for five seconds, if it’s too hot for your hand then it’s too hot for your pet’s paws.

Be careful when travelling with your pet in the car, make sure the windows are open or the air conditioner is on. And as all pet parents should know - NEVER leave your pet in a parked vehicle.

Place your pets’ water outside in a shady spot, and make sure they have plenty of it! If you don’t have a large enough bowl, fill up more smaller bowls. Adding some ice cubes to the water can help keep it cooler for longer.

Buy a plastic clam/shell pool to fill with water and place outside in the shade. This works amazingly when your pet needs to cool off!

Pets don’t sweat like we do – they pant instead, which lowers their body temperature. If your pet is having some trouble cooling down, effective but not sudden cooling is key. Try covering them with wet towels or spraying them gently with cool water. Adding some ice packs under their mat or blankets and even making some frozen treats can help. Brachycephalic breeds (those with a short nose like Pugs, Bulldogs, Boston Terriers etc) can’t cool themselves as effectively through panting. If you see them panting cool them immediately with wet towels or spray some cool water on them.

Signs to keep an eye out for

If you notice any of these signs you should bring your senior pet to one of our vets immediately.

  • Excessive panting and saliva
  • Purple or red gums
  • Distress and collapsing
  • Dizziness
  • Bright red tongue

Time to enjoy this wonderful warm weather in the most safe and relaxing way possible!