Spring cleaning hazards

Springtime is the perfect time to shake off those winter blues and freshen up our homes for the busier, warmer months ahead. While we are clearing out and cleaning up, some of the products and tools we use potentially threaten our pets if not handled properly!

Check out some of the issues that can occur for our furry and feathered friends when they come into contact with common household cleaning chemicals:

  • Ensure that any cleaning products you use are out of reach of your pets and stored securely, so they don’t end up accidentally ingesting any poisons. Also, be aware of where you’ve cleaned with a harsh chemical – sometimes, when dry, the residue might taste appealing to your pet.
  • Do not use aerosol sprays around pets, especially birds! Move the animals to another room altogether to avoid them breathing in any chemicals or particles.
  • Ensure that pet’s food and water supply is also clear of any chemicals you may be spraying – droplets and particles can easily contaminate food and water, leading to ingestion later on.
  • When disposing of chemicals or their container, be sure your pet cannot access the rubbish bin.
  • Bottle caps, elastic bands, plastic bags, sponges, and other scrubbing implements can become choking hazards, should they fall into the wrong paws! Make sure these are stored safely and out of reach of your pet.
  • When airing out your home for a clean, make sure that all window and door screens are secure and that your indoor pet cannot sneak out unnoticed!
  • Mops, sponges, and brooms can appear like a fun, interesting new toy for a playful puppy or curious kitten! Be sure to keep your fur-baby away from these to avoid any loose bristles being eaten.

If you suspect your pet has ingested or inhaled any cleaning poisons, call your nearest vet clinic immediately.

The following symptoms are signs your pet could be poisoned and seriously ill:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Excessive sneezing and/or coughing
  • Lethargy
  • Seizures

If you have any questions or concerns, please call your local vet clinic immediately.


Dog surrounded by colourful eggs

Brush up on Easter pet dangers

Dog surrounded by colourful eggs
Is your Easter celebration pet safe?

It’s Easter time again, which means there is a greater chance that our furry family members will get themselves into some mischief and eat things that they shouldn’t. Here is a quick refresher on some of the Easter dangers to watch out for.

Chocolate is toxic for both dogs and cats

The increase of chocolate in and around the house increases the risks that your pets may ingest some. Make sure that you pack all chocolate away high up in the cupboard (or the fridge) so that it is out of reaching distance.

If you’re having an Easter egg hunt around the house or in the yard, make sure you know how many eggs you hid so that you can account for them all. If you miss some and leave them hidden, your pet could find and eat them.

Sultanas, grapes and raisins are off limits

The ingestion of sultanas, grapes or raisins can be fatal to your furry family members. Even the smallest amount of these foods may risk serious illness or death in some animals. Make sure to keep your hot cross buns away from your pets!

Decorative grass

You may be planning to gift an Easter hamper, on maybe you’ve been given one that contains the classic Easter decoration – decorative grass. This popular decoration is dangerous to your pets if they eat it. If you receive a hamper with decorative grass, dispose of it immediately in a bin that is out of reach from your pets.

 Sugar free is not okay

Even though sugar-free products may be healthier for humans, they are very toxic for pets. Most sugar-free foods contain a sugar substitute named Xylitol that may cause serious harm to your pet.

Look out for these symptoms:

  • Vomitting
  • Restlessness
  • Increased Urination
  • Stiffness
  • Seizures

If you notice any of these symptoms, contact one of our veterinarians as soon as possible.