Bee stings

With springtime upon us, we can expect to see more blossoming trees and flowers popping up all over the garden – and with that comes bees. Your dog or cat might think a bee is a harmless new friend, providing a bit of excitement and fun with a game of chase! Often this can result in your pet receiving a bee sting to the face, mouth, or paws.

Has my pet been stung?

It will be very clear almost immediately if your pet has been stung. Keep an eye out for:

  • A sudden or continuing cry from your pet, indicating pain and discomfort
  • Your pet running around in circles or otherwise erratically
  • Licking, chewing, or pawing the same spot repeatedly
  • Unusual swelling
  • Excessive drooling
  • Pale gums

In some extreme cases, pets can experience severe reactions and experience vomiting, collapse, hives, profound swelling, and difficulty breathing. If your pet has been stung by more than one bee or in the mouth or throat, their reaction is more likely to be severe, and they can potentially experience anaphylactic shock. It is essential to act fast.

What should I do if my pet has been stung?

Stay calm! Panicking will only increase your pet’s stress.

The stinger will continue to release venom until it has been removed, causing pain and discomfort.

If you have noticed any of the above-mentioned severe reactions, give us a call and make your way in to see us immediately.

If your pet is having a mild reaction and experiencing discomfort only:

  • Try to locate the site of the sting
  • If you can find it, remove the stinger gently with tweezers

Once you are sure the stinger has been removed:

  • Apply cool water via washing the site or pressing it gently with a wet cloth.
  • Keep an eye on your pet for any developing symptoms, and ensure they are well hydrated.

If your pet appears uncomfortable or develops a more severe reaction after removing the sting, please give your vet clinic a call for further advice.


Top Tips for Taking Your Cat to the Vet

The key to making your cat's trip to the vet, or any trip in their carry cage, a stress-free one is creating a positive association with their cage, carrier or cat box. Here are some simple steps to help make your cat's excursions more pleasant for you and your feline friend.

1)Regular preventative check-ups when COVID eases.

A trip to the vet doesn’t always have to be about needles. Get your cat used to visiting the vet and practice regular care such as brushing, nail trimming and teeth brushing at home.

In addition to annual vaccinations, your cat will also benefit from a free dental check, a weigh-in or an overall health check. These additional check ups are especially important for older pets (which in cat terms is over 7 years of age).

 

Reward your cat with treats and positive attention when you get home.

2) Choose the right cat carrier.  

If your cat is particularly stressed, a top loading carrier means some of the examination duties we can be performed on your cat whilst they remain in their carrier.

Don’t tip your cat out of the cage – allow them to walk out by themselves or remove them gently from the carrier.

3) Practice at home. 

Include your cat's carry cage as part of your household furniture in a spare room or in the laundry.

Leave the cage door open so your cat can investigate it or even play in it allowing him/her to develop a positive association with the cag. (This season is an ideal time to get your cat accustomed to their carrier

4) Create a safe place. 

Feeding your cat meals and treats in his/her carrier creates a positive association and reduces anxiety associated with the cage.

Put your cat's favourite bed in the cage to create a safe and familiar environment for your cat.

In the car, drape a blanket or towel over the carrier to reduce motion sickness and help your cat feel safe.

5) Smells

Avoid strong smelling chemicals such as bleach or ammonia-based products - not only do cats dislike the smell, they may think another cat has marked the territory! Clean the cat carrier with soap and water, or water with a small amount of white vinegar added.

You can also spray the cage and bedding with Feliway 'happy pheromone' spray at least 30 minutes before using the carrier to create a reassuring environment and help reduce stress.


Santa's Naughty List: Christmas Dangers for your pet

While we celebrate Christmas and indulge in the holiday season, it is important to remember to be mindful of our furry family members.

There are many dangers both obvious and not so obvious that your pet can encounter this holiday season, below is a list of some of the things to keep aware of.

Christmas pet dangers infographicChocolate

Make sure not to leave chocolate where it can be easily reached by your pet - like under the Christmas tree!

Candles

Don't leave lit candles unattended. Better yet, ensure your pet is securely in a safe place if you have candles lit.

Snow Globes

Snow globes can easily fall from shelved and break, especially with curious cats around. Broken glass on the floor and be a major hazard for your pet.

Tinsel

While not poisonous, tinsel can still be very harmful if eaten by your pet.

String Lights

There are multiple dangers for a pet with Christmas lights. They may get tangled in them or may receive electric shocks.

Grapes and Sultanas

Everyone loves a good fruit cake at Christmas. However, grapes and sultanas are toxic for dogs. Keep this out of their reach.

Onion and garlic

Large quantities of onion and garlic are toxic to dogs if ingested. Keep an eye on what your pet is eating.

Heatstroke

With Christmas time also comes the hot weather. On very hot days make sure your pet has a cool place to stay, lots of water and don't exercise them too much.

Holly

Mistletoe and holly berries are toxic to pets. Keep these plants out of reach of your pets.

Artificial Sweetener

Sugar-free foods are still not necessarily good for your pets. If your pet ingests artificial sweeteners, it can be fatal.

Bones

Dogs can only chew on raw bones, never feed cooked bones as these can splinter, causing internal damage or intestinal obstruction.

Costumes

We don't recommend dressing your pet in a costume, however, if you choose to, make sure they are monitored at all times. If they are visibly uncomfortable, remove the costume immediately.

Decorations

Be mindful of decorations that are dangling or within reach of pets, these can be a choking or injury hazard.

House Guests

Your pets may get stressed or ever excited with frequent or new visitors. Make sure that you keep an eye on how your pet is feeling. Keep your pets in a secure place if they don't like it when guests are over. ­­


Vet holding dog and cat

Focus on worms

Both dogs and cats need to be regularly treated for worms. The most common form of worms are roundworms, hookworms, whipworms and tapeworms. Most of the time your pet can be infected with worms without you even knowing. Because of this, both dogs and cats worming schedules should be followed closely to prevent them from infection.

In this article, we will explore the different types of worms that can infect your pet.

Vet holding dog and cat
It is essential to stay on top of worming treatment for your pet

Roundworms

This is the most common type of worm in both dogs and cats. Adult roundworms live in the intestines of our pets and can produce 200,000 eggs per day. Many pets don’t show any signs of being infected, however in major cases of infection the symptoms are:

  • Rapid breathing, nasal discharge and cough, sometimes pneumonia
  • Vomiting and diarrhoea
  • Swollen abdomen
  • Poor overall condition, weight loss and a poor coat
  • Faeces with spaghetti-like worms up to 18cm

Whipworms

Whipworms aver 4 – 7.5cm in length and can live up to 1.5 years. Their eggs are very resistant and can remain infectious for up to 5 years in the environment. Whipworms usually only infect dogs and cause problems especially in kennels. Most infections are without symptoms but sometimes can lead to slimy diarrhoea and fresh blood.

Hookworms

These worms live in the small intestine and feed on the lining of the intestines and can be potentially fatal. Hookworms also suck blood which can lead to internal blood loss. In older animals, the blood loss may be chronic, and the pet may have diarrhea and show weight loss.

Tapeworms

This tapeworm is largely harmless and is transmitted via fleas and sometimes lice. Cats and dogs can catch a flea and eat it, and in doing so can infect itself with the eggs of the tapeworm that are inside the flea. Tapeworm can grow to up to about 50cm but a pet will only show symptoms when there are many of them – such as diarrhoea.

How to protect your pet

It is essential to stay on top of worming treatment for your pet. Take note of their last treatment and when their next treatment is due to ensure that they stay protected at all times. As well as a timely treatment there are extra things you can do to keep your pet protected:

  • Disinfect food and water bowls regularly
  • Annual wellness checks with your veterinarian.
  • Pick up after your pet regularly
  • Keep their common areas clean

Cat scratching itself on grass

Surviving the spring skin symptoms

Spring can be a challenging time for pet parents and their fur babies due to a range of symptoms that can arise from the warmer weather, spring flowers and a high pollen count.  Your pets’ skin is usually the most affected by this change in season and can result in redness, itchiness and even lesions. We’ve put together a handy guide to surviving the season.

Cat scratching itself on grass
There are some measures that can be taken to prevent them from occurring

Types of skin issues and irritations

One of the key signs that may alert you to a skin irritation in your pet is an increase in scratching. The constant itch that can’t be soothed can be very distressing for your pet and may even disrupt their sleep and change their mood.

On closer inspection you might start to notice redness, swelling and dryness. These irritations can spread very quickly and can make your pet extremely uncomfortable. If left untreated, even minor irritations could lead to infection.

Prevention is key

While skin irritations can occur due to several reasons, there are some measures that can be taken to prevent them from occurring.

Make sure that your pet is treated regularly for fleas and parasites to prevent unnecessary skin irritation. On top of flea and worming treatment, your pet should be brushed and bathed regularly with an appropriate shampoo.

Keeping common areas clean and vacuumed can reduce the likelihood of skin irritations, as well as keeping your pets bedding clean and changing their blankets regularly.

If you notice any signs of skin irritation in your pet, book in a consultation with one of our veterinarians to determine the cause and the best course of treatment.

List of how to prevent skin allergies in spring