Bee stings

With springtime upon us, we can expect to see more blossoming trees and flowers popping up all over the garden – and with that comes bees. Your dog or cat might think a bee is a harmless new friend, providing a bit of excitement and fun with a game of chase! Often this can result in your pet receiving a bee sting to the face, mouth, or paws.

Has my pet been stung?

It will be very clear almost immediately if your pet has been stung. Keep an eye out for:

  • A sudden or continuing cry from your pet, indicating pain and discomfort
  • Your pet running around in circles or otherwise erratically
  • Licking, chewing, or pawing the same spot repeatedly
  • Unusual swelling
  • Excessive drooling
  • Pale gums

In some extreme cases, pets can experience severe reactions and experience vomiting, collapse, hives, profound swelling, and difficulty breathing. If your pet has been stung by more than one bee or in the mouth or throat, their reaction is more likely to be severe, and they can potentially experience anaphylactic shock. It is essential to act fast.

What should I do if my pet has been stung?

Stay calm! Panicking will only increase your pet’s stress.

The stinger will continue to release venom until it has been removed, causing pain and discomfort.

If you have noticed any of the above-mentioned severe reactions, give us a call and make your way in to see us immediately.

If your pet is having a mild reaction and experiencing discomfort only:

  • Try to locate the site of the sting
  • If you can find it, remove the stinger gently with tweezers

Once you are sure the stinger has been removed:

  • Apply cool water via washing the site or pressing it gently with a wet cloth.
  • Keep an eye on your pet for any developing symptoms, and ensure they are well hydrated.

If your pet appears uncomfortable or develops a more severe reaction after removing the sting, please give your vet clinic a call for further advice.


Spring cleaning hazards

Springtime is the perfect time to shake off those winter blues and freshen up our homes for the busier, warmer months ahead. While we are clearing out and cleaning up, some of the products and tools we use potentially threaten our pets if not handled properly!

Check out some of the issues that can occur for our furry and feathered friends when they come into contact with common household cleaning chemicals:

  • Ensure that any cleaning products you use are out of reach of your pets and stored securely, so they don’t end up accidentally ingesting any poisons. Also, be aware of where you’ve cleaned with a harsh chemical – sometimes, when dry, the residue might taste appealing to your pet.
  • Do not use aerosol sprays around pets, especially birds! Move the animals to another room altogether to avoid them breathing in any chemicals or particles.
  • Ensure that pet’s food and water supply is also clear of any chemicals you may be spraying – droplets and particles can easily contaminate food and water, leading to ingestion later on.
  • When disposing of chemicals or their container, be sure your pet cannot access the rubbish bin.
  • Bottle caps, elastic bands, plastic bags, sponges, and other scrubbing implements can become choking hazards, should they fall into the wrong paws! Make sure these are stored safely and out of reach of your pet.
  • When airing out your home for a clean, make sure that all window and door screens are secure and that your indoor pet cannot sneak out unnoticed!
  • Mops, sponges, and brooms can appear like a fun, interesting new toy for a playful puppy or curious kitten! Be sure to keep your fur-baby away from these to avoid any loose bristles being eaten.

If you suspect your pet has ingested or inhaled any cleaning poisons, call your nearest vet clinic immediately.

The following symptoms are signs your pet could be poisoned and seriously ill:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Excessive sneezing and/or coughing
  • Lethargy
  • Seizures

If you have any questions or concerns, please call your local vet clinic immediately.


Understanding Rat Bait Toxicity

With winter upon us, many of us will be spending more time indoors. This can also be the case for unwanted rodents. Many of us use rat poison/bait to defeat these critters, but these poisons also pose a risk to our household pets if they happen to ingest rat bait directly or by eating a rodent who has consumed the bait. There are many steps you can take to ensure your pet is protected!

The effect of rat bait on your pet

Rat bait acts as an anticoagulant (prevents the blood from clotting) by depleting the body's supply of vitamin K. Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin and is essential in forming clotting agents in the bloodstream. It can take between 1-5 days after ingestion to see the signs of toxicity, but once the symptoms become prevalent or you believe your pet may have ingested some bait, it is crucial to act fast!

What to do if your pet has ingested rat bait

It is extremely important to bring them straight to our clinic if you have seen your pet eat rat bait or notice the signs of rat bait toxicity. If you cannot visit, please ring us for advice on how to treat your pet immediately.

Some of the signs of rat bait toxicity may include:

  • Pale gums or haemorrhages on the gums
  • Lethargy
  • Bleeding from the nose, existing wounds or cuts
  • Blood in their urine or faeces
  • Vomiting and/or diarrhoea
  • Respiratory issues (coughing, breathing difficulties, rapid breathing)
  • Seizures or muscle tremors

The effects on pets who have consumed rat bait varies based on which rat bait was ingested, how long ago it was ingested and how much was eaten. In all circumstances, if you have a box of the rat bait, please bring this in with you (or a picture on your phone). Finding out the name and its active ingredients will assist with the treatment of your furry friend!

What are the treatment options?

Treatment of your furry friend is based on the severity of the toxicity and when it was ingested. Blood may need to be taken for clotting tests and assessment of anaemia.

Treatment may be as simple as giving a vitamin K treatment for 3-6 weeks or may require more intensive treatment such as blood transfusions and hospitalisation. In some cases, even with the most intensive treatment, if action is not quickly taken, some ingestion cases can be fatal.

Alternative options to rat bait

If you want to avoid using rat bait around your home, we recommend to:

  1. Use mouse or rat traps in places pets can't reach (this can be extremely difficult with cats!)
  2. Keep your pet on a lead around areas where rat bait is present
  3. Keep unwanted rodents out of your garden and home. Avoid leaving human or pet food lying around, keeping a secure lid on waste and compost bins, keeping outdoor areas clean and tidy, and removing items that could be a potential home or food supply.

If you suspect your pet has eaten rat bait, please contact us and immediately bring your pet into our clinic. If you have any questions about rat bait toxicity, please speak to our vet clinic team.


How to throw your pet a party (safely)!

It’s the time of year to get together with your family and friends and celebrate the holidays in the summer sun. The same goes for your pets! Arranging a party for your pets can be a world of fun, but there are some things to keep in mind to make sure every person and pet is safe.

The guest list

Make sure to invite dogs that your dog is already familiar with or that you know are calm in social situations. You might invite other dogs that frequent your dog park or dogs of friends and neighbors.

 

Picking the venue

You want to keep it simple with a familiar place for your dog and their friends. This could be a backyard, a dog park, or even some doggie daycare centres will let you hire out the space. If a friend or neighbor offers their yard, make sure you go over to check first that it is very well enclosed and there are no dangers for excited dogs like gardening tools.

 

Invitations

You might decide to do a digital invitation, create a Facebook event or just text your guests, either way you should include in the invitation that all dogs attending should be up to date with their vaccinations, flea and worm treatments and remind them there will be lots of dogs running around so to be cautious if they are bringing children.


Stock the bar

Make sure that you have lots of bowls filled with fresh and clean water. You will need to top them off throughout the day.

Supplying the entertainment

Get your guests to come prepared with dog toys so that the furry friends don’t get up to destructive mischief, like things to throw, chew or even a kiddie pool.

Lastly, the catering

There are many shops and online stores where you can buy pet-friendly foods, cakes and treats. If you are planning on making your own and are scouring the internet for recipes, remember that just because a recipe says it is for dogs, doesn’t necessarily mean it is safe. Here are some common ingredients to avoid:

  • Peanut butter. Lots of recipes online use peanut butter, but some peanut butters contain Xylitol which can be toxic to dogs. Be sure to check the ingredients before using.
  • Any bones whether they are cooked or uncooked.
  • Any milk or dairy products
  • Coconut Oil

Remember to ask your guests if their dogs have any food aversions or allergies!


Is your pet bushfire ready?

Does your bushfire escape plan include your pets? Here are some things to think about while you are planning ahead this bush fire season.

Bushfire Relocation Kit

In NZ’s increasingly dry summers, bushfires are a threat we should be prepared for. A relocation kit is made in preparation for either a quick departure, or if you are moving your pet to a safe location on high fire risk days. The kit for your pet should be packed and in an easy to reach location through the bushfire season. The pack should include:

  • Food and water
  • A bowl for each pet
  • A second collar and lead
  • A carrier for cats and smaller pets
  • Bedding and a woollen blanket
  • A pet first-aid kit – seek your vet's advice
  • A favourite toy
  • Any medications, along with a written list of what they are
  • Your pet's medical history, including proof of vaccination
  • Your vet's contact details

It is also important to ensure that your pet has up to date identification in case you get separated. While tags are helpful, they are easily lost. Microchipping is the most reliable way of ensuring that if you become separated or need to leave your pet in a shelter, they are returned to you successfully.

If you choose to stay in your home

If you choose to say in your home on high risk days, keep your pets inside and secure with plenty of water. You can also place ice blocks in their water bowl to help keep them cool. Ensure you have towels or woollen blanket that are easy to reach if you need to protect your pet.

Pet injuries after a fire

If your pet has suffered burned injuries during a fire, it is important they are treated as soon as it is safe to do so. Make sure you know where your closest vet clinic or animal shelter is located.

Signs of dehydration

On high-risk days pets are more susceptible to dehydration and heat stress. If you notice any of the following signs, please contact your local veterinarian:

  • Excessive panting
  • Salivating
  • Agitation
  • Red gums

Dog-sniffing-plant

Flowers and Plants that are toxic for your pet

It’s spring and there are lots of flowers in bloom. Take some time to familiarise yourself with a few of the flowers and plants that may be toxic to your pet.

There are many flowers and plants that can be toxic to your pets. Below we have listed some of the more common ones, for a more extensive list of plants unsafe for your pets, please visit https://www.rspcavic.org/cats-toxic-plants.

 

Aloe Vera Plant

Aloe Vera

Although Aloe Vera is considered to have some medicinal properties, it can be toxic for pets to ingest. The toxic compounds in aloe are saponins, which are toxic to cats, dogs, birds and lizards.

 

Lilies

The entire Lily plant is extremely toxic to pets, particularly cats, and may only need to have minimal amounts of contact to cause toxicity. Ingesting any part of the plant can cause kidney failure in a relatively small period of time. Owners should make sure their cats never have access to lilies of any kind. While most types of lilies are toxic, the most toxic types of lilies are:

Asiatic lily (including hybrids)
Daylily
Easter lily
Oriental lily
Rubrum lily
Wood lily
Stargazer lily
Tiger lily
Japanese Show lily

 

Hydrangeas

Another common garden flower, hydrangeas contain cyanogenic glycosides and the entire plant and flower is considered toxic. Hydrangeas can also be known as Hortensia, Hills of Snow and Seven Bark.

 

Ivy

Many types of Ivy including Devil’s Ivy and English Ivy post a threat to your pet’s health if ingested. This plant has numerous aliases including Branching Ivy, Glacier Ivy, Needlepoint Ivy, Sweetheart Ivy and California Ivy.

 

Bird of Paradise

Bird of Paradise is a very common garden flower that’s leaves can cause a toxic reaction if ingested. The leaves contain hydrocyanic acid, which is non-toxic to humans but can be harmful to pets.

 

Signs that your pet has ingested a poisonous plant

Keep an eye out for the following symptoms that may indicate your pet has ingested something harmful:
• Nausea
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Dehydration or excessive thirst
• Incoordination
If you have seen or suspect that your pet has ingested a toxic plant, please contact your veterinarian immediately.


Dog with pumpkins wearing a trick or treat sign

8 Halloween Dangers for Your Pet

Halloween is a time to have fun and let your imagination run wild, also to eat yourself sick on chocolate and lollies. It is important that while we are having fun, we remain mindful of our furry family members and keep them safe and out of trouble. Here are some of the things to keep in mind for this Halloween season.

Dog with pumpkins wearing a trick or treat sign
Be mindful about where you leave your chocolate goodies

Chocolate

Chocolate is the obvious major hazard for Halloween. Even a small amount of chocolate can be toxic for your pet. If your pet ingests chocolate, they may experience the following symptoms:

  • General hyper-excitability and anxiousness
  • Seizures
  • Rapid heart rate (tachycardia)
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Cardiac arrest

Be mindful about where you leave your chocolate goodies and if there are children in the house, make sure they know the dangers of giving your pet chocolate. If you suspect that your pet has eaten chocolate, call your local veterinary immediately.

Xylitol

Xylitol is a common sugar substitute that is present in sugar-free chocolate and other consumables and is unfortunately very toxic to pets. Ingesting Xylitol can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), seizures, liver failure, or even death. So even if your chocolate or candy is sugar-free it still may not be safe for your dogs. As a general rule, keep them away from chocolate all together.

Raisins

Raisins can be a common addition to many Halloween treats.  Grapes, raisins, and currants can lead to acute kidney failure in dogs if ingested. It is best to keep any foods with raisins or currants far out of reach of your furry family member.

Trick or treaters

While Halloweens in Australia does not see as many trick or treaters as America, you may still get a few knocks on the door. If you know that your dog does not like strangers or is a little too curious when there is a knock at the door, make sure they are safely secured somewhere far from the front door.

Costumes

Dressing up your pet can be cute and fun, and very instagramable! However, make sure you choose costumes that do not have parts that are dangling or small pieces that can be swallowed. It is best to keep a close eye on your pet while they are wearing the costume, and if they are becoming visibly distressed, remove the costume immediately.

Decorations

Whether you are having a party or turning your front year into a Halloween Spooktacular, make sure your pet is kept away from any decorations that have small parts that could be a choking hazard. If you are planning on using fake spider web, ensure that you do so out of reach of any pets.

Lost pets

Greeting trick or treaters means a lot of opening and closing of the front door, cat parents will know that this a prime opportunity for the stealthy trickster to make a daring escape. While this is hard to control, you can make sure that your pets ID tag is up to date so that they can be safely returned home if they do get out.

Candles

Candles are a great way to set the scene for your spooky Halloween get together, you may even bring out the Ouija Board to scare the pants off your guests. A dog’s happy tail or a cat’s affinity to knocking things off benches could be all it takes to turn a spooky night into a call to the fire bridge. If you have lit candles, ensure your pets are in a secure place far away from them.