Top Tips for Taking Your Cat to the Vet

The key to making your cat's trip to the vet, or any trip in their carry cage, a stress-free one is creating a positive association with their cage, carrier or cat box. Here are some simple steps to help make your cat's excursions more pleasant for you and your feline friend.

1)Regular preventative check-ups when COVID eases.

A trip to the vet doesn’t always have to be about needles. Get your cat used to visiting the vet and practice regular care such as brushing, nail trimming and teeth brushing at home.

In addition to annual vaccinations, your cat will also benefit from a free dental check, a weigh-in or an overall health check. These additional check ups are especially important for older pets (which in cat terms is over 7 years of age).

 

Reward your cat with treats and positive attention when you get home.

2) Choose the right cat carrier.  

If your cat is particularly stressed, a top loading carrier means some of the examination duties we can be performed on your cat whilst they remain in their carrier.

Don’t tip your cat out of the cage – allow them to walk out by themselves or remove them gently from the carrier.

3) Practice at home. 

Include your cat's carry cage as part of your household furniture in a spare room or in the laundry.

Leave the cage door open so your cat can investigate it or even play in it allowing him/her to develop a positive association with the cag. (This season is an ideal time to get your cat accustomed to their carrier

4) Create a safe place. 

Feeding your cat meals and treats in his/her carrier creates a positive association and reduces anxiety associated with the cage.

Put your cat's favourite bed in the cage to create a safe and familiar environment for your cat.

In the car, drape a blanket or towel over the carrier to reduce motion sickness and help your cat feel safe.

5) Smells

Avoid strong smelling chemicals such as bleach or ammonia-based products - not only do cats dislike the smell, they may think another cat has marked the territory! Clean the cat carrier with soap and water, or water with a small amount of white vinegar added.

You can also spray the cage and bedding with Feliway 'happy pheromone' spray at least 30 minutes before using the carrier to create a reassuring environment and help reduce stress.


So you're taking your dog on a hike?

With the weather heating up and restrictions easing, many families with furry family members are getting back into nature and taking their dogs out with them. This raises the question of how to safely take your dog on a hike.

Plan ahead

Taking your dog on a hike shouldn’t be a spur of the moment decision. There are a few things that need to be prepared in order for your pet to have an enjoyable time while staying safe. Before you decide on a hiking spot, make sure to check whether it is pet friendly.

Assess if your dog is up for it

Not all dogs are made for long walks. Dogs that are too young or old lack the strength and stamina needed to accompany you on a hike. Brachycephalic breeds such as pugs do not cope well in heat or with strenuous exercise and should stick to shorter walks and trails.

Obeying commands

Believe it or not, there are rules and etiquette around bringing your dog on a hike. At the bare minimum, your dog should be able to listen to and obey commands such as sit and come even when they are faced with new and exciting stimuli.

Work up to it

If you have never taken your dog out on a trail before, start small and work your way up to assess whether they have the appropriate stamina and if they are obeying commands or if they need some further training.

What to pack

If you’ve done your research, assessed all the variables and your dog is trained and ready, here is a list of things to take along with you for the hike:

  • Small serving of dry food
  • Water and a collapsible bowl
  • Doggy first aid kit
  • Poop bags
  • Foot care
  • Towel
  • Brush

You should also make sure their ID tag on their collar is up to date in case they get lost on the hike.

If you’re unsure if it’s okay to take your pet for a hike, please consult your local Veterinarian.


Where can my dog pick up fleas?

There are a lot of places and ways for your dog to pick up fleas this spring. We’ve listed them all here in one handy place.

Other animals
Your dog can pick up fleas through contact with other animals, and we don’t just mean other dogs. Fleas aren’t picky as to where they hang out and can transfer from other household animals like neighboring cats and even rabbits.

Dog parks
Dog parks can be a happy hunting ground for parasites like fleas. Some dog owners may not be aware that their dog has a flea infestation and bring them to a dog park to play with and run around other dogs. In this situation, fleas can easily spread to other dogs in the park.

Dog Daycare/boarding kennels
Like a dog park, a pet parent may inadvertently cause the spread of fleas to other dogs by sending their infested dog to daycare. Most good daycare facilities will check that all their clients are regularly flea treated and wormed.

Backyard
As you now know, fleas can transfer from other animals who frequent your yard and leave flea eggs in the environment.

Your home
Poor flea control during the winter months can mean flea eggs are in your home waiting for the right conditions to hatch when the temperature warms up. Treatment all year round is vital to prevent this from happening.

If you are starting to think that your pet can get fleas anywhere – you are right! Your dog should be protected all year round regardless of if your dog is exclusively inside or not. You can discuss the many options available with one of our veterinary team to find the right solution to protect your pet.


dog and cat eating from bowl

Maintaining a healthy weight for your pet: your questions answered

Helping your furry family member to maintain a healthy weight not only improves their quality of life but significantly reduces the risk of serious conditions associated with obesity. To help you keep your pet on track, we’ve answered some common questions on weight and nutrition.

What's a healthy weight for my pet?

Just as in humans, a healthy weight is not the same number for each pet. There are many factors that need to be taken into consideration such as breed, age, gender and overall health. The best way to determine the ideal weight for your best is to discuss with our team.

Dog weight scale Cat weight scale

…But my pet’s always been overweight.

There are some specific factors that could make your furry family member predisposed to weight gain, and therefore maintaining a healthy weight is even more important. There are several breeds of dog that are more likely to gain weight than others, including Beagles, Pugs, Labrador Retrievers, Cocker Spaniels, Scottish Terriers and Saint Bernards. Female dogs are also more likely to gain weight, and if your dog has been de-sexed they are more likely still; the frequency of obesity in de-sexed male and female dogs can be twice that of entire dogs.

For cats, some factors which may make your cat more likely to struggle with weight gain and obesity are:

  • Breed and sex
  • Aged between five and 10 years old, when their activity begins to decline
  • Fed very frequently and more than the recommended portion (or fed ad lib.)
Sad overweight dog
Pet owners need to be strict with their dog's diet

How do I maintain my pet’s weight?

Rigorously maintaining good eating practices is the most effective way to maintain your pet’s healthy weight.

  • Feed your pet at the same place, time and with the same bowl every time
  • Don’t feed them scraps
  • Don’t give in to begging
  • Swap their treats for kibble taken from their daily allowance of food
  • Weigh them once a month and have regular veterinary check-ups

How does being overweight or obese affect my pet?

When your pet is overweight or obese, it is increasingly likely to store the food it consumes as fat, rather than using it up. This happens because they are increasingly inactive and the energy your pet is expending is less than the energy it's taking in. This extra fat can begin to affect the function of specific organs – such as the liver – or ‘coats’ others, like arteries. The extra weight also puts pressure on your pet’s joints, leading to arthritis and degenerative joint disease.

What are the risks if my pet is overweight or obese?

In general, obesity can reduce your pet’s quality of life and life expectancy; it’s harder for it to play and move around, and surgical procedures or check-ups become more difficult. There are some other issues that can arise from obesity.

Diabetes

Obese pets can be more at risk of diabetes. Often, the diabetes can be reversed once any extra weight is lost (particularly in cats), as the accumulated fat which is directly responsible for a failure to regulate glucose is no longer present.

Arthritis

Obesity in pets is one of the leading causes of arthritis in cats and dogs as the excess weight can put unnecessary strain on the joints – particularly in older pets.

How do I exercise my cat?

While giving your dog exercise can be as easy as taking them for a walk, the way to exercise a cat can be less obvious.

Ensure that you have regular playtime with your cat, particularly if they live indoors. Indoor cats need, on average, a third fewer calories than outdoor cats due to their lower energy expenditure, so playing with them is a good way to increase their movement and reduce the likelihood of gaining weight.

Two minutes of playtime twice a day, gradually increasing as they get more active, is an excellent start. Give them toys they can play with by themselves, or food toys which encourage them to play with an object to get a few kibbles as a reward.

Which food is best for my overweight pet?

There are many specific types of wight management food that is designed to assist in your journey to help your furry family member lose weight. It is best to consult one of our Veterinarians on the best choice of food for you and your pet.